Lakes of Mars

Back into the Time War, Rassilon, back into hell!

126 notes

Anonymous asked: Umm its explicitly stated that the Doctor is supposed to die on Trenzalore but doesn't anyway. Clara breaks the rules. She changed history. It's not a plot hole, it's part of the plot. The point wasn't fixed and Clara changed the future

pleasefiremoffat:

the-wolf-in-the-police-box:

pleasefiremoffat:

Go look at my last response.

I don’t see how it works.

It’s clearly stated you can’t change events you’re part of. If the Doctor doesn’t die on Trenzalore, NotD can’t happen and Clara can’t jump into the Time Stream.

If Clara doesn’t jump in the Time Stream, the Doctor can’t meet Oswin or Clara Oswin, inspiring him to look for the real Clara, nulling of series 7 part 2. (I’m not even going to get into the long term effects of this, such as Clara never being there to save the Doctor a billion times and him thus dying on several occasions).

BUT WAIT, THERES MORE.

Clara’s crying is what inspired the Doctor to save Gallifrey. If she isn’t with him, he doesn’t save Gallifrey, he destroys it with War and Ten.

If he doesn’t save Gallifrey, there’s no “oldest question in the universe”, and therefor the Church of the Silence is never created.

If the Church is never created, the plot of series 6 never happens and River Song as we know her CANT exist.

Also, it the Church isn’t created, Kovarian can’t blow up the TARDIS. Therefor the plot of series 5 as we know it doesn’t happen.

Literally everything from Eleventh Hour on is impossible and a paradox if the Doctor does not die on Trenzalore.

image

So the future writers can just do something to say Clara just never met the Doctor or something, and all of Moffat’s era implodes upon itself?

I think this revelation will go down in anti-Moffat history.

They can either get rid of Clara, or get rid of Missy (who’s heavily implied to have been the reason modern Clara called the Doctor in the first place, thus beginning the chain of events that would lead to everything else). If they get rid of Missy, we could have Jenna Coleman making cameos in the future, as regular Clara.

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Hopefully the next shorunner will see this and do something to spark this chain of undoing events.

Y E S

Filed under Moffat Hate

159 notes

breakingbadfriends:

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.
Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.
Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.
Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”
– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu
   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan

breakingbadfriends:

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.

Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.

Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.

Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”

– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu

   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan

(via heisenbergchronicles)

6,810 notes

stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: Tommie Smith and John Carlos, Olympics 1968

“We were just human beings who saw a need to bring attention to the inequality in our country.” - Tommie Smith

On this date (10/16) in 1968, the ‘black power’ salute at the Summer Olympics in Mexico City. One of my favorite historical photos and one of the most powerful moments in black history. More background here.

Photo credits:

  1. Summer Olympics, Mexico City, 1968
  2. Summer Olympics, Mexico City, 1968
  3. San Jose State University honors former students Smith & Carlos with a statue on campus, 2005
  4. Smith and Carlos, 2011

(via tastiereconsumate)

3,427 notes

de-preciated:

The Full Moon Looms Over Clouds (by Arkku)
The full moon was visible from our balcony for about half an hour tonight and last night between some buildings and a tree. I was using the 400mm lens as a telescope (with a DIY eyepiece holder), but just before the moon was obscured by the tree I took a couple of quick shots with the camera. This is a crop from one of them; 400mm alone is not enough to fill this much of the frame in prime focus. (The moon at 1500mm does fill the frame, but that requires more effort to set up. =) Jupiter was just below the moon tonight, with four of its moons clearly visible. Technical details: EBC Fujinon-T 400mm f/4.5 @ f/5.6, 1/125s, ISO 100

de-preciated:

The Full Moon Looms Over Clouds (by Arkku)

The full moon was visible from our balcony for about half an hour tonight and last night between some buildings and a tree. I was using the 400mm lens as a telescope (with a DIY eyepiece holder), but just before the moon was obscured by the tree I took a couple of quick shots with the camera. This is a crop from one of them; 400mm alone is not enough to fill this much of the frame in prime focus. (The moon at 1500mm does fill the frame, but that requires more effort to set up. =)

Jupiter was just below the moon tonight, with four of its moons clearly visible.


Technical details: EBC Fujinon-T 400mm f/4.5 @ f/5.6, 1/125s, ISO 100

(via victoriarty)

Filed under moon space nature

33 notes

Steven Moffat on the Doctor and Soldiers:

feuertrunkenbrax:

"The ultimate hypocrisy at the heart of the Doctor, which is fun to poke a stick at, is that he’s so nasty about soldiers and about people who carry guns, yet look at him - always in the middle of the fight, usually taking command, and I’m not so impressed at his refusal to pick up a gun when he’s inclined, occasionally, to blow up entire planets! I think Danny Pink would say, ‘Look, I picked up a gun to save that guy’s life. You blow up a planet, and you sod off.’ And I think that’s a good character trait of the Doctor’s. I like that he’s the ultimate autocratic liberal - you know, the fascist liberal. It’s what I love about the Robin Hood thing, because it reminds us that the Doctor never stops being a nobleman. He’s a high-born nobleman, used to wealth and privilege, who decided to come down among us lot and help out. He thinks he’s one of the guys, but never stops assuming that he’s in charge and that people will make him tea. You love the Doctor, but you do think, ‘You’re a bit of an arse, and you really, really do think that everybody’s here to carry stuff for you.’ That’s true throughout the Doctors, however ‘men of the people’ they pretend to be. They’re really wonderful men trying to help everybody, but the Doctor does, just like Robin Hood, expect to be in charge. He doesn’t really tolerate being second in command. He’s helping out the people, so long as he can be the boss person with the best bow and arrow - and one day that will come back to haunt him.”

So Moffat sees the Doctor as a fascist liberal
a fascist liberal
and he likes it.

Filed under Moffat Hate fascism Don't you think he looks tired? Moffat critic Doctor Who